Pediatric Leaders from Sub-Saharan Africa Meeting

On August 17th and 18th, Columbia Global Centers Nairobi hosted a PGIF Workshop by Drs' Phillip Larussa, Wilmot James and Lawrence Stanberry - which involved a Pediatric Leaders from Sub-Saharan Africa.  Participants were from Ethiopia, Malawi, Rwanda, South Africa, Lesotho, Uganda, Tanzania, Zambia, Mozambique, Ghana, and Liberia.

The goal of this meeting was to assemble key African pediatric leaders in the academic, government and not-for-profit sectors to discuss Global Health Security Agenda issues as they relate to the child and adolescent.

Editor's note:

The Global Health Security Agenda (https://www.ghsagenda.org/) and its Joint External Evaluation (JEE) tool that now rests with the WHO, provide a rigorous method to evaluate the ability at the country level to respond to critical events such as epidemic outbreaks, and mass casualties due to bioterrorism or natural disasters. To date, more the 65 countries have participated (http://www.who.int/ihr/procedures/mission-reports/en/). While the JEE is a very useful tool, it does not address the issues that are specific to the pediatric population.

August 17, 2018

On August 17th and 18th, Columbia Global Centers Nairobi hosted a PGIF Workshop by Drs' Phillip Larussa, Wilmot James and Lawrence Stanberry - which involved a Pediatric Leaders from Sub-Saharan Africa.  Participants were from Ethiopia, Malawi, Rwanda, South Africa, Lesotho, Uganda, Tanzania, Zambia, Mozambique, Ghana, and Liberia.

The goal of this meeting was to assemble key African pediatric leaders in the academic, government and not-for-profit sectors to discuss Global Health Security Agenda issues as they relate to the child and adolescent.

The meeting sought to develop consensus recommendations on how institutions that provide care for children and adolescents in Africa could be evaluated in terms of their abilities to provide care for this population in the event of a critical event.

The Pediatric doctors shared their views in relation to child health care in their relevant countries. It was clear that those doctors who came from the same region had similar challenges.   Recommendations from this meeting of will be used to develop a child-centric JEE-like tool that will then be used to evaluate 24 representative institutions in Southern Africa as the initial step in a larger project to both evaluate, provide recommendations for improvement of existing services, and to advocate for additional resources to improve the care of children and adolescents in these critical events.