Welcome to Columbia Global Centers | Santiago

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The Santiago Center was officially launched in March 2012. It has mainly focused on organizing public programs featuring Columbia faculty, researchers, and students and covering themes that are in the frontline of the global and local public policy agenda.  It has established extensive partnerships with Chilean academic community, government institutions, businesses, and NGOs to co-sponsor public programs and to develop relationships with local scholars and  scientists in order to engage in joint-research projects.

The Center is engaged in recruitment efforts to inform Chilean students and professionals about the degrees and courses offered by Columbia in New York. It also helps in searching for research and internship opportunities in Chile for Columbia undergraduate, graduate and doctoral students.

The Center occupies a 400-square-foot, two-suite office on the first floor of the Flacso building in the Vitacura neighborhood of Santiago, adjacent to the headquarters of the United Nations Economic Commission for Latin America and the office of the International Labor Organization. .

UPCOMING EVENTS

Los Últimos Días de Stalin

Centro de Extensión y Centro de Estudios Avanzados y Extensión – PUCV (Antonio Bellet 314, Providencia, Metro Manuel Montt.)
6:30 PM - 8:00 PM

NEWS

December 04, 2017

Public School Children Construct Memory Through Art

"The Route of Freedom and Hope" was the name chosen by the children from primary school Escuela Republica de Israel for the one-day art intervention they organized at Plaza Yungay, one of Santiago's  most emblematic public spaces, to remember and honor the victims of the Holocaust. They had been learning and reflecting on diversity and human rights in their History, Language, Religion and Art classes throughout the semester in the framework of an innovative educational project implemented by this public school’s principal and teachers.

November 23, 2017

Lecture on Russian History: The 1904-07 Revolution

A different Russian Revolution, occured ten years before 1917, tells us more about Russian politics and society than the one being commemorated in its centenial and is linked to global developments in deeper ways than the latter. This was the argument  developed by Columbia’s history professor Catherine Evtuhov  in a lecture entitled “Was There a Revolution in 1917? A View from Russia’s Imperial Period”.